Kami

Country: Japan Category: Religion By: fearfrog
Kami
Kami is the Japanese word for the spirits within objects in the Shinto faith. Although the word is sometimes translated as "god" or "deity," Shinto scholars point out that such a translation can cause a serious misunderstanding of the term. In some instances, such as Izanagi and Izanami, kami are personified deities, similar to the gods of ancient Greece or Rome. In other cases, such as those concerning the phenomenon of growth and natural objects, the spirits dwelling in trees, or forces of nature, translating "kami" exclusively as "god" or "deity" would be a gross mischaracterization. In this respect it is more similar to the Roman concept of the numen.

Kami may, at its root, simply mean "spirit", or an aspect of spirituality. In Chinese, the character for kami is used to refer to various nature spirits of traditional Chinese religion, but not to the Taoist deities or the Supreme Being. An apparently cognate form, perhaps a loanword, occurs in the Ainu language as kamui and refers to an animistic concept very similar to Japanese kami.

Kami are the central objects of worship for the Shinto faith. Shinto began as the various ancient animistic folk religions of Japan, and only became a unified religion in response to the influences of other religions brought into Japan from abroad. Thus, the concept of kami was developed first in various regional folk religions before being unified into the single religion of Shinto. As a result, the nature of what can be called "kami" is very broad and encompasses many different concepts and phenomena.

Some of the objects or phenomena designated as kami are qualities of growth, fertility, and production; natural phenomena like wind and thunder; natural objects like the sun, mountains, rivers, trees, and rocks; some animals; and ancestral spirits.

There are other spirits designated as kami as well. For example, the guardian spirits of the land, occupations, and skills; spirits of Japanese heroes, men of outstanding deeds or virtues, and those who have contributed to civilization, culture and human welfare; those who have died for the state or the community; and the pitiable dead. Not only spirits superior to man can be considered kami, but also spirits that are considered pitiable or weak have been considered kami in Shinto.

The concept of kami has been changed and refined since ancient times, although anything that was considered to be kami by ancient people will still be considered kami in "modern" Shinto--"modern" meaning the time since it was formalized into a unified religion under the influence of foreign religions like Buddhism. Even within modern Shinto, there are no clearly defined criteria for what should or should not be worshipped as kami. The difference between modern Shinto and the ancient animistic religions is mainly a refinement of the kami-concept, rather than a difference in definitions.

In the ancient animistic religions, kami were understood as simply the divine forces of nature. Worshippers in ancient Japan revered creations of nature which exhibited a particular beauty and power such as waterfalls, mountains, boulders, animals, trees, grasses and even rice paddies. They strongly believed the spirits or resident kami deserved respect.

Although the ancient designations are still adhered to, in modern Shinto many priests also consider kami to be anthropomorphic spirits, with nobility and authority. These include such mythological figures as Amaterasu, the sun goddess of the Shinto pantheon. Although these kami can be considered deities, they are not considered omnipotent or omniscient. In the myths of Amaterasu, for example, she could not see the events of the human world. She also had to use divination rituals to see the future.

How people are finding this page:
13  ancient japan kami       11  ancient japanese kami       6  kami ancient japan       3  kami in ancient japan       3  kami religion       3  images of the japanese fox goddess       3  japanese kami spirits       2  japanese deities related to waterfall ritual       2  concept of kami       2  ancient japan- kami       2  what is considered kami       2  japanese spirits       2  kamiphenoman       1  Worshippers in ancient Japan revered creations of nature which exhibited a particular beauty and power such as waterfalls mounta       1  The concept of kami has been changed and refined since ancient times, although anything that was considered to be kami by ancien       1  differences in shinto and animism       1  shinto pantheon       1  nature spirit kami       1  the word faith in japanese       1  Kami Japan Faith       1  ancient animism shinto       1  Concept of kami in shinto       1  shinto spirits objects       1  what is the difference between animism and shinto       1  kami spirits japan culture       1  animism from ancient japan       1  difference between shinto and animism       1  are japanese kami anthropomorphic       1  japanese kami nature       1  shito natural objects spirit       1  the difference between kami and god       1  username to kami       1  kami of natural objects       1  kami of natural objects       1  kami of natural objects       1  kami of natural objects       1  natural asian form       1  what is similar to kami       1  difference between shinto and kami       1  Kami as a Natural Phenomena       1  Natural Phenomena of a Kami       1  kami spirit shinto       1  are spirits considered kami       1  whats the difference between kami and god       1  ancient japan religion       1  believe that kami personified deities dwell in trees and other forces of nature       1  kami worship in ancient japan       1  Kami is the Japanese word for the spirits within objects in the Shinto faith. Kami are the central objects of worship for the        1  what is the difference between a god and kami in shinto       1  what is the difference between animism and shintoism       1  yhs-ifm1       1  some of the objects or phenomena designated as kami are qualities of growth fertility and production natural phenomena like win       1  kami the fox ancient japan       1  ancient japanese first kami       1  ancient japan kami       1  kami ancient religion       1  what is the difference between a god and kami       1  Kami are the central objects of       1  difference between kami and god       1  anciemt japanese kami       1  yhs-fh_lsonswrow       | 102 |


Post Below: Kami

Page Posts: 4


PMzUzlHgaPE

c0M00bDcLC


Hey, that's porewful. Thanks for the news.
December 05, 2016
23:06:13

9JEchTMfb

XGdYEEBsj


December 05, 2016
21:36:55

ABtkwNSvt

eucO9q6Ied5


Ahoj gurama. Tvoje rieÅ¡enie a) je spre1vne a najndejoduchÅ¡ie možne9.V rieÅ¡ened Äasti b) je ve4ÄÅ¡ina krokov spre1vna a jasne1; celkovo je to zaujedmavfd predstup, avÅ¡ak zdf4vodnenie existencie Tvojej preche1dzky po tromine1ch (nazval by som ju "Hamiltonovskou"), je veľmi ve1gne. Nakoniec, existujfa "Å¡achovnice" (napredklad 2x4 s chfdbajfacimi kockami na dvoch opaÄnfdch rohoch) a predsluÅ¡ne9 pokrytia, kde take1 preche1dzka neexistuje. PreÄo by akure1t hypoteticke9 pokrytie Å¡achovnice zo zadania nemalo byÅ¥ tohoto typu?Prezradedm vÅ¡ak, že ÄasÅ¥ b), podobne ako a), me1 aj jedno veľmi jednoduche9 a presvedÄive9 rieÅ¡enie (keÄ už ho Älovek pozne1, samozrejme).
November 05, 2014
13:35:00

ToiVQ8gkT

iEfzt5aRJNx


Zeby b) bolo zakerne? Vysvetlim.Ked si vestky policka oznacime po diagonalach cislami 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, ... tak, ze lavy horny roh bude 1, dve policka dole a doprava 2, dalsie tri 3, dalsie styri 1 atd., tak mame podobnu situaciu, ako pri a). Kazdy polozeny trojpolickovy obdlznik zasahuje prave na jednu 1, jednu 2 a jednu 3. Lenze mam rozny pocet 1, 2 a 3 - postupne 25, 26 a 27. Takze to nejde.Zakerne to je preto, ze sachovnica nabada na dve farby a brani vidiet, ze sa to da tromi farbami / znakmi. Asi by to bolo lahsie, keby sachovnica nebola sachovnicova. :-)
November 05, 2014
05:58:06
Name
E-mail*
City, State/Province, Country
Comment:



* Your E-mail will never be distributed or displayed.
You will not be put on mailing lists.
全部
All Pages
文化
Culture
風水
Feng Shui
流行
Style
植物
Plants
野生動物
Wildlife
歷史
History
飲食
Food
宗教
Religion
語言
Language


© Copyright 2009 AsianForm.com. All Rights Reserved. Flash Web Design by Artatom.com